One Week, One Proverb #28

Cartoon: peace vs.war  by Nayer (pic source: toopool.com)
Cartoon: peace vs.war by Nayer (pic source: toopool.com)

Case 28:

“May the child not die, may the child not die”: let it die and let’s see if the day won’t break.

 

Insight/Background Story:

She was the typical African under siege from the extended family system. First, her sisters-in-law accused her of not taking good care of them whenever they came to visit. Then they accused her of sleeping around, causing her husband to beat the living daylights out of her. Physically and emotionally bruised, she thought she’d had enough and so ran away; she returned to her father’s house where she was welcomed and promptly taken care of.

Like a ball unwilling to be submerged in water, the truth eventually came to hand. Months after her abrupt departure, her husband, accompanied by his people, came to beg for forgiveness. He pleaded with her to return home, that he and their kids needed her and that he was willing to be a better husband and father. After a long-drawn-out negotiation, she and her people agreed and pardoned him. Of course, she’d hoped this day would come.

Several years afterward, her husband, a prominent bank executive was forced to resign. The living standard of her family as a result took a dive, its sustenance now dependent on whatever her dry-cleaning business could bring in. But her sisters-in-laws had a different view. They returned with fresh accusations, calling her a witch (practicing juju) and the mastermind behind her husband’s failure.

Upset that her husband couldn’t confront his sisters, she requested a meeting where he, his sisters, brothers, and some of respected elders from his kindred would be present. Sadly the meeting didn’t go well. It reached a stalemate, where she, in clear terms, told her sisters-in-law that if they weren’t prepared to accept her as a friend and good wife to their brother, she would go down that road of war and animosity with them.

 

Interpretation/Conclusion:

When you strike your foot against a hard object, what feeling do you get? A sharp pain? Unless you are not human or have sensory problems, then the answer is a definite yes. In essence, it means that our actions have consequences.

Just as some people contribute positively to the society they find themselves, there are others who are the polar opposite. Be it a manifestation of one side the human nature or that they are under the influence of something very powerful (physical, psychological or otherwise), we commonly refer to this latter group as wicked.

Religious or not, I believe everyone wants a world where there is love and coexistence. So, what would you do if Mr See-You-No-More views you as a target and not a friend? Personally I don’t think I will be in the same room with this man after I’ve done what’s humanly possible to be a friend to him. Peace cannot be kept by force; it can only be achieved by understanding.

 

Advertisements

14 thoughts on “One Week, One Proverb #28

  1. Your conclusion is completely true. If a person refuses to change negative behavior and words you should move on. Life is too precious to waste it suffering with people who do not want to create a positive and loving environment. Great to hear from you again. Looking forward to your e-book.

  2. True! A lot of times when being good and patient does not work, other means must be employed – unpleasant but unavoidable.

    Look forward to more from your e-pen. 🙂

    1. We are on the same page. We, too, are humans and not targets.

      I’m gad you dropped by, Meenakshi. And I look forward to more of your poems.

  3. I like your reply to the comment above. Despite the harsh treatment she earlier received, she returned in good faith. When things took a downturn, she got the blame. It seems she will always be a scape goat . . .

    1. Yes, Timi. She at some point had to take stand and fight back. I often wonder what goes on in the head of a troublemaker, does he really love making other people unhappy?

  4. Unfortunately, the motives and actions highlighted in this post can be moved from culture to cultures. Just change a few details here and there. People have to know when to move on.

    1. Exactly, Dan. People have to know when to move on. It’s safer and better than to become another person’s punching bag – for the sake of peace.

      Thanks for commenting.

Your thoughts matter

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s